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Zion National Park Cliff Face Deep Canyon Forest Plains

A wide cliff face, deep canyon, and forest plains in the southwest make up Utah’s Zion National Park. St. George is about 30 miles 50 kilometers north of the park on the Colorado Plateau. Cedar Breaks National Monument is close to the northeast.

Bryce Canyon National Park and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Park are close to the east. Pipe Spring National Monument as well as the northern border of Grand Canyon National Park are located to the south. Prashant National Monument is to the southwest.

Zion Canyon History

Its main characteristic is Zion Canyon, named after the Mormon pioneers who settled the area in the early 1860s. A part of the park initially designated as Mukuntuweap National Monument in 1909. The monument expanded and named Zion National Monument in 1918 and declared National Park in 1919. The park further developed in 1956 by adding adjacent property that had previously designated Zion National Monument. This property is now known as Kolob Canyons. The entire park covers two miles or 593 square kilometers.

Limestone strata provide evidence of the area’s geological origins. Its submerged and uplifted over the last 300 million years. It then covered in volcanic ash, dried out into an eerily windswept desert, then flooded. Thirteen million years later, it thrust upwards once more. The sediment-laden rivers began the process of erosion that led to Zion’s stunning valley and canyon formations. Zion Canyon, for example formed through the Virgin River, is about 15 miles 25 km long and up to 3000 feet 600 to 900 meters deep.

The rock domes along with the pinnacles that line the canyon walls vary in color from rust-red at lower elevations, and then almost white at the top. Numerous fossils found in canyon walls indicate that prehistoric inhabitants of the area were once descendants of Pueblo Indians and the Ancestral Pueblo culture. The Great White Throne is a monolith rising 2,394 feet 730 meters above the valley floor. Other sites in the park include Emerald Pools, Weeping Rock and The Temple of Sinawava. These are all located in Zion Canyon, and Kolob Arch which is located within the Kolob Canyons area.

Geological Of Zion National Park Canyon

Geologically, sedimentary rocks are evidence of its ancestry. This area has over the course of 300 million years, come under water and uplifted. It was then covered in volcanic ash, turned into an eerily windswept desert and then flooded about 13 million years earlier, pushed upwards again. Sediment-laden rivers started the process of erosion responsible for Zion’s spectacular valley and canyon formations. Zion Canyon, for example formed by the Virgin River, is about 15 miles 25 km long and between 2,000 and 3000 feet 600 to 900 meters deep.

The domes of sandstone along with the pinnacles that line the canyon walls vary in color from rust-red at lower elevations, and then almost white at the tops. The extensive fossil evidence on the wall has provided evidence that suggests that prehistoric tribes were influenced by Ancestral Pueblo culture. Pueblo Indians were once present in the region. The Great White Throne, a massive monolith on a canyon wall, stands 2,394 feet 730 meters above the canyon floor. Other sites in the park include Emerald Pools, Weeping Rock as well as The Temple of Sinawava. These are situated in Zion Canyon, and Kolob Arch in the Kolob Canyons area.

Zion Wildlife

Zion’s wildlife comprises Mule deer Golden eagles, mule deer, mountain peregrine falcons, lions and the Zion snail which is native to the park. Bighorn was brought back within the park’s boundaries in 1973, after having been extinct two years earlier. In addition to the more than 800 species of native plants, there are also semi-arid species such as cactus, cottonwoods, willows, and box elders found along the canyon’s bottom.

Juniper and pines are also present higher up. Walking as well as the horse riding are both popular pursuits. In the year 2000, traffic congestion and parking issues led to the establishment of a shuttle bus service within the park. From April to October, the principal route that runs through Zion Canyon is accessible only by bus.